Versión en español a continuación

By Sara Aguirre Sánchez-Beato, Isis International

The Philippines: the Reproductive Health Bill or HR Bill has been under discussion for the last 15 years, representing one of the most controversial issues in the country nowadays. On August 7 the House of the Representatives will vote on it. This Bill aims at granting women access to maternal health care, family planning and sexual education, to provide women (and men) with the right and accurate information that will enable them to decide if and when they will have children. Decision-making is only possible when a human being is aware of the alternatives she or he has and can actually have access to them; otherwise freedom does not truly exist. The RH Bill, If passed, will be empowering for the population and will ameliorate women's and children's health, especially for the poorest. Abortion is illegal and still will be if the RH Bill passes.

Spain: During Franco's dictatorial regime (1939-1975), the national-Catholicism ideology banned contraceptive methods under fine or arrest, and divorce was not allowed. Abortion was illegal, pushing thousands of poor women to undergo clandestine abortions despite its dangers; while upper-class women could afford a trip to England for the same purpose. In 1985, abortion was allowed in only three cases – if the woman was raped, if the fetus had malformations and/or if there was a risk for the physical or mental health of the woman. Still, a doctor had to give permission to women. In 2009, the Socialist Party passed a new sexual and reproductive health law (Ley Orgánica 2/2010 de Salud Sexual y Reproductiva y de Interrupción Voluntaria del Embarazo) that granted sexual education – which is still largely lacking in the country, approved the purchase of the morning-after pill in pharmacies without medical prescription and modified the abortion regulations, establishing a timeframe of 14 weeks for abortion without restrictions based only on women's decision.

Philippines: The Catholic Church in the Philippines, despite its life, freedom and human dignity claims, is against the RH Bill, stating that artificial contraception and abortion are the same thing, and are pressuring congressmen and women to vote against it on August 7. The RH Bill is only about education and information, therefore pro-choice; the Catholic Bishops' Conference in the Philippines prefers the population to be ignorant and not to have choices[i].

Spain: The Minister of Justice, Alberto Ruiz Gallardón (Partido Popular), has stated that he will change the Sexual and Reproductive Health law in September 2012, restricting the rights already granted. He claims that the reason why we women undergo abortions is the existing "structural violence" against us that forces us to do it, not because it is our own decision – that is, we women are not able to reason about what we really need or want[ii]. He even said this week that he would not allow abortions when the fetus has a serious illness incompatible with life, which would make Spain as one of the most restrictive countries in the EU[iii].

Philippines: Fifteen women die per day because of maternal-related issues, one of the highest maternity death rates in Asia, and nine thousand people die of HIV/SIDA per year. Although abortion is illegal, herbal remedies ("pampa regla") are sold in the streets to stop pregnancies. The estimated number of clandestine abortions in the country is half a million per year. The birth rate in the Philippines is 3.3 children per woman; however this rate doubles in the case of poorer women. According to the Government, one-third of the population lives on one dollar a day. The reproductive health issues are not a problem for the upper class who can afford contraceptives and access to health services, but it is a question of survival for the poorer. Still, the Catholic Church in the Philippines is against the RH Bill.

Spain: The Government has restricted the free access to health services to irregular immigrants[iv], leaving 500,000 human beings without the right to health in the country. This is especially serious in cases of people with HIV/AIDS who will stop receiving medical treatment. Besides, the Minister of Health has her particular fight against the morning-after pill. She claims it can be dangerous for health and deems the findings of the three studies that proved the opposite not to be conclusive[v]. Meanwhile, the Minister of Justice wants to restrict women's right to safe abortion, what would lead again to clandestine actions to stop pregnancies in poorer women and new trips to London for the ones who can pay for it. These actions are supported by the Spanish Bishops' Conference[vi].

Besides, the neoliberal economic measures that the Government has recently adopted are diminishing public services such as education, health and social services for children and the elderly, which will not make it easier for women to have children if they so desire.

Philippines: RH Bill advocates ask that the bill be passed in the House of Representatives on August 7. The current President of the Philippines, President Benigno Aquino III, supports it, as well as 143 congressmen and women. The Reproductive Health Advocacy Network that gathers health service providers, women's organizations, people's organizations, party-list federations and academic institutions is organizing campaigns, rallies, demonstrations and press conferences to support the RH Bill[vii].

Spain: In view of the seriousness of the situation due to the attack on the sexual and reproductive health in the country, 222 women's organizations, health providers and political parties have created the platform "Nosotras decidimos"[viii] (We women decide). Hundreds of advocates rallied in Madrid on July 29, 2012 against the modification of the law[ix].

Philippines: Where 80% of the population is Catholic, 69% support the RH Bill[x].

Spain: More than 100,000 people have signed the petition against the modification of the current law[xi]. According to a Metroscopia survey, 65% of the Partido Popular voters and 64% of Catholics are against the suggested change, as well as 81% of the total population[xii].

Philippines: As Randy David says "What is more interesting to watch, in my view, is the extent to which our politicians will assert their independence from the clerics" (...) "The RH bill will be a test of how far the nation's political system has achieved operational closure from religion. It will give us an indication of the state of our institutional modernity"[xiii].

Spain: The interpretation that has been made of Gallardón's initiative is that he is trying to ingratiate himself with his voters, especially the more conservative Catholics and the right.

Can you see any similarities? Do you think it is a mere coincidence? Some days ago I read on a blog that "the fight for contraception has not only not finished – actually it hasn't started yet"[xiv]. In some countries women and some brave men are asking for their sexual and reproductive rights, whereas in other countries we have to fight to preserve what was already attained. In different degrees, women's rights are threatened everywhere in the world. Historically, women's fight for rights has been a continuous struggle with progress and backlashes. And the reason is that there is a lot at stake. Sexual and reproductive health is clearly a political issue: it means women's control of our own bodies, a challenge of the traditional order of privileges, a redefinition of life, a change in the hierarchical power relations and the empowerment of the entire population, women and men. The higher the opposition to our demands, the more important they are. The constant and peaceful revolution that women have been leading for centuries is the most empowering and liberating revolution for humanity ever. We have to be aware of the backlashes, but they will not make us give up. We will not give up.

RH Bill should be passed in the Philippines! The Sexual and Reproductive Health law should not be modified in Spain!

[i] http://cbcpforlife.com/?p=8178

[ii] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/03/08/actualidad/1331177681_396483.html

[iii] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/07/22/actualidad/1342948376_467327.html

[iv] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/04/20/actualidad/1334935039_248897.html

[v] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/03/21/actualidad/1332358054_330288.html

[vi] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/04/19/actualidad/1334851398_727102.html

[vii] http://www.likhaan.org/rhan/

[viii] http://nosotrasdecidimos.org/manifiesto/

[ix] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/07/29/actualidad/1343570216_372488.html

[x] http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/nation/view/20101201-306256/Pulse-69-favor-RH-bill

[xi] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/08/02/actualidad/1343925103_756779.html

[xii] http://politica.elpais.com/politica/2012/07/28/actualidad/1343507067_583781.html

[xiii] http://opinion.inquirer.net/33859/the-church-gma-and-the-rh-bill

[xiv] http://feministasfeas.blogspot.com/2012/05/por-que-los-hombres-patriarcales-estan.html

Derechos y salud sexual y reproductiva en Filipinas y España: pasado común, luchas comunes

Filipinas: La ley de salud reproductiva o RH Bill lleva siendo discutida durante los últimos 15 años, representando uno de los temas más controvertidos en el país actualmente. El próximo martes 7 de agosto será votada en el Congreso. El objetivo de esta ley es garantizar a las mujeres el acceso a la salud materna, la planificación familiar y la educación sexual, proporcionando a las mujeres (y a los hombres) la información correcta y adecuada que les permitirá decidir si y cuándo tener hijos e hijas. La toma de decisiones sólo es posible cuando el ser humano es consciente de las alternativas de las que dispone y puede tener acceso a ellas; de lo contrario la verdadera libertad no existe. La RH Bill será por lo tanto empoderadora para la población y mejorará la salud de las mujeres y la infancia, especialmente para las más pobres. El aborto es ilegal y seguirá siéndolo si la RH Bill se aprueba.

España: Durante la dictadura de Franco (1939-1975), la ideología nacional-católica prohibió los anticonceptivos bajo multa o arresto y el divorcio no estaba permitido. El aborto era ilegal, empujando a muchas mujeres a llevar a cabo abortos clandestinos a pesar de los riesgos para la salud, mientras que las mujeres de la clase alta podían costearse un viaje a Inglaterra con el mismo fin. En 1985, el aborto fue permitido bajo tres supuestos – el de violación de la mujer, malformaciones del feto o si existía riesgo para la salud física o mental de la mujer. Aun así, las mujeres necesitaban la autorización médica para ello. En 2009 el Partido Socialista aprobó una nueva ley, la Ley Orgánica 2/2010 de Salud Sexual y Reproductiva y de Interrupción Voluntaria del Embarazo, que garantiza educación sexual – aún escasa en el país-, permitía la compra de la "píldora del día después" en las farmacias sin receta médica y modifica la anterior legislación del aborto estableciendo un período de tiempo de 14 semanas para el aborto sin restricciones basado únicamente en la decisión de la mujer.

Filipinas: La Iglesia Católica en Filipinas, a pesar de sus afirmaciones de vida, libertad y dignidad humana, se opone a la aprobación de la RH Bill, afirmando que la anticoncepción y el aborto son lo mismo y presionando a congresistas para que voten en contra el 7 de agosto. La RH Bill trata únicamente de educación e información, es por lo tanto pro-elección, la Conferencia Episcopal Católica de Filipinas (Catholic Bishop Conference in the Philippines) prefiere mantener a la población ignorante y sin opciones[i].

España: El Ministro de Justicia, Alberto Ruiz Gallardón (Partido Popular) ha afirmado que modificará la Ley de salud sexual y reproductiva el próximo mes de septiembre 2012, restringiendo los derechos garantizados actualmente. Defiende que la razón por la que las mujeres abortamos se debe a la existencia de una "violencia estructural" que nos fuerza a ello, no porque sea nuestra propia decisión – es decir, las mujeres no somos capaces de razonar sobre lo que necesitamos o queremos[ii]. Incluso afirmó esta semana que prohibirá el aborto en los casos de fetos con anomalías incompatibles con la vida, lo que colocaría a España entre uno de los países más restrictivo de la UE[iii].

Filipinas: Quince mujeres mueren al día por problemas relacionados con la salud materna, una de las tasas más elevadas de Asia, y nueve mil personas mueren al año por VIH/SIDA. Aunque el aborto es ilegal, en las calles se venden hierbas y remedios caseros ("pampa regla") que lo inducen. El número aproximado de abortos clandestinos es de medio millón al año. La tasa de fertilidad en Filipinas es de 3'3 hijos/as por mujer; sin embargo esta tasa se duplica en el caso de las mujeres más pobres. Según datos del gobierno, un tercio de la población vive con un dólar al día. Los temas de salud reproductiva no son u problema para la clase alta que puede permitirse los anticonceptivos y el acceso a los servicios de salud, pero es una cuestión de supervivencia para las personas con menos recursos. A pesar de todo, La Iglesia Católica de Filipinas se opone a la aprobación de la RH Bill.

España: El gobierno ha restringido el acceso gratuito a los servicios de salud a las personas inmigrantes irregulares[iv], dejando a 500.000 seres humanos sin el derecho a la salud en el país. Esto es especialmente grave en el caso de personas con VIH/SIDA que dejarán de recibir tratamiento médico. Por otro lado, la Ministra de Salud tiene su particular guerra contra la píldora del día después. Asegura que es peligrosa para la salud y considera que los resultados de los tres estudios que muestran lo contrario no son concluyentes[v]. Al mismo tiempo, el Ministro de Justicia quiere restringir el derecho de las mujeres a abortos seguros, lo que conducirá a acciones clandestinas para detener los embarazos en el caso de las mujeres más pobres y nuevos viajes a Londres para las que se lo puedan permitir. Estas acciones son apoyadas por la Conferencia Episcopal española[vi].

Por otro lado, las medidas económicas de corte neoliberal que el gobierno está adoptando recientemente están disminuyendo servicios públicos como educación, sanidad y servicios de atención a la dependencia y la infancia, lo que no facilitará que las mujeres tengan hijas/os si desean hacerlo.

Filipinas: Defensoras y defensores de la RH Bill exigen que se apruebe en el Congreso el próximo 7 de agosto. El actual presidente de Filipinas, Benigno Aquino III, la apoya así como 143 congresistas. La Reproductive Health Advocacy Network que reúne servicios de salud, organizaciones de mujeres, organizaciones populares, partidos políticos e instituciones académicas está emprendiendo campañas, manifestaciones, demostraciones y ruedas de prensa en apoyo a la RH Bill[vii].

España: Ante la seriedad de la situación por el ataque a la salud sexual y reproductiva en el país, 222 asociaciones de mujeres, servicios de salud y partidos políticos han creado la plataforma "Nosotras decidimos"[viii]. Cientos de defensoras y defensores se manifestaron en Madrid el pasado 29 de julio contra la modificación de la ley[ix].

Filipinas: Donde el 80% de la población es católica, el 69% apoya la RH Bill[x].

España: Más de 100.000 personas han firmado la petición en contra de la reforma de la actual ley[xi]. Según una encuesta de Metroscopia, el 65% de los electores y electoras del Partido Popular y el 64% de las personas que se declaran católicas practicantes están en contra de la reforma sugerida, así como el 81% de la población total[xii].

Filipinas: Como Randy David afirma "Lo que es más interesante de ver, desde mi punto de vista, es el grado que nuestros políticos tienen de afirmar su independencia del clero" (...) "La RH Bill será la mejor prueba para comprobar hasta dónde nuestro sistema político nacional ha alcanzado su ruptura operacional con la religión. Nos ofrecerá un indicativo del estado de nuestra modernidad institucional"[xiii].

España: La interpretación de las iniciativas de Gallardón es que intenta congratularse con su electorado, especialmente con el más conservador y católico.

¿Alguna similitud? ¿Mera coincidencia? Hace algunos días leí en un blog que "la lucha por la anticoncepción no sólo no ha terminado – no ha empezado todavía"[xiv]. En algunos países las mujeres y algunos hombres valientes demandan sus derechos sexuales y reproductivos, mientras que en otros luchamos por preservar lo que se había conseguido hasta ahora. A diferentes niveles, los derechos de las mujeres se ven amenazados en todos los rincones del planeta. Históricamente la lucha de las mujeres por sus derechos ha sido una continua resistencia con pasos hacia adelante y hacia atrás. Y la razón de esto es que hay mucho en juego. La salud sexual y reproductiva es un claro asunto político: significa el control de las mujeres de nuestros propios cuerpos, un desafío al orden tradicional de privilegios, una redefinición de la vida, un cambio en las jerárquicas relaciones de poder y el empoderamiento del conjunto de la población, mujeres y hombres. Cuanta más oposición haya a nuestras demandas, más importantes significa que son. La revolución constante y pacífica que las mujeres protagonizan desde hace siglos es la más empoderadora y liberadora revolución para la humanidad. Hemos de ser conscientes de los retrocesos, pero no nos harán abandonar. No abandonaremos.

¡La RH Bill debe ser aprobada en Filipinas! ¡La Ley de salud sexual y reproductiva no debe modificarse en España!

[i] http://cbcpforlife.com/?p=8178

[ii] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/03/08/actualidad/1331177681_396483.html

[iii] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/07/22/actualidad/1342948376_467327.html

[iv] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/04/20/actualidad/1334935039_248897.html

[v] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/03/21/actualidad/1332358054_330288.html

[vi] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/04/19/actualidad/1334851398_727102.html

[vii] http://www.likhaan.org/rhan/

[viii] http://nosotrasdecidimos.org/manifiesto/

[ix] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/07/29/actualidad/1343570216_372488.html

[x] http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadlines/nation/view/20101201-306256/Pulse-69-favor-RH-bill

[xi] http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2012/08/02/actualidad/1343925103_756779.html

[xii] http://politica.elpais.com/politica/2012/07/28/actualidad/1343507067_583781.html

[xiii] http://opinion.inquirer.net/33859/the-church-gma-and-the-rh-bill

[xiv] http://feministasfeas.blogspot.com/2012/05/por-que-los-hombres-patriarcales-estan.html

Versión en español a continuación

By Sara Aguirre Sánchez-Beato, Isis International

The Philippines: the Reproductive Health Bill or HR Bill has been under discussion for the last 15 years, representing one of the most controversial issues in the country nowadays. On August 7 the House of the Representatives will vote on it. This Bill aims at granting women access to maternal health care, family planning and sexual education, to provide women (and men) with the right and accurate information that will enable them to decide if and when they will have children. Decision-making is only possible when a human being is aware of the alternatives she or he has and can actually have access to them; otherwise freedom does not truly exist. The RH Bill, If passed, will be empowering for the population and will ameliorate women’s and children’s health, especially for the poorest. Abortion is illegal and still will be if the RH Bill passes.

Spain: During Franco’s dictatorial regime (1939-1975), the national-Catholicism ideology banned contraceptive methods under fine or arrest, and divorce was not allowed. Abortion was illegal, pushing thousands of poor women to undergo clandestine abortions despite its dangers; while upper-class women could afford a trip to England for the same purpose. In 1985, abortion was allowed in only three cases – if the woman was raped, if the fetus had malformations and/or if there was a risk for the physical or mental health of the woman. Still, a doctor had to give permission to women. In 2009, the Socialist Party passed a new sexual and reproductive health law (Ley Orgánica 2/2010 de Salud Sexual y Reproductiva y de Interrupción Voluntaria del Embarazo) that granted sexual education – which is still largely lacking in the country, approved the purchase of the morning-after pill in pharmacies without medical prescription and modified the abortion regulations, establishing a timeframe of 14 weeks for abortion without restrictions based only on women’s decision. 

Philippines: The Catholic Church in the Philippines, despite its life, freedom and human dignity claims, is against the RH Bill, stating that artificial contraception and abortion are the same thing, and are pressuring congressmen and women to vote against it on August 7. The RH Bill is only about education and information, therefore pro-choice; the Catholic Bishops’ Conference in the Philippines prefers the population to be ignorant and not to have choices[i].

Spain: The Minister of Justice, Alberto Ruiz Gallardón (Partido Popular), has stated that he will change the Sexual and Reproductive Health law in September 2012, restricting the rights already granted. He claims that the reason why we women undergo abortions is the existing “structural violence” against us that forces us to do it, not because it is our own decision – that is, we women are not able to reason about what we really need or want[ii]. He even said this week that he would not allow abortions when the fetus has a serious illness incompatible with life, which would make Spain as one of the most restrictive countries in the EU[iii].

Philippines: Fifteen women die per day because of maternal-related issues, one of the highest maternity death rates in Asia, and nine thousand people die of HIV/SIDA per year. Although abortion is illegal, herbal remedies (“pampa regla”) are sold in the streets to stop pregnancies. The estimated number of clandestine abortions in the country is half a million per year. The birth rate in the Philippines is 3.3 children per woman; however this rate doubles in the case of poorer women. According to the Government, one-third of the population lives on one dollar a day. The reproductive health issues are not a problem for the upper class who can afford contraceptives and access to health services, but it is a question of survival for the poorer. Still, the Catholic Church in the Philippines is against the RH Bill.

Spain: The Government has restricted the free access to health services to irregular immigrants[iv], leaving 500,000 human beings without the right to health in the country. This is especially serious in cases of people with HIV/AIDS who will stop receiving medical treatment. Besides, the Minister of Health has her particular fight against the morning-after pill. She claims it can be dangerous for health and deems the findings of the three studies that proved the opposite not to be conclusive[v]. Meanwhile, the Minister of Justice wants to restrict women’s right to safe abortion, what would lead again to clandestine actions to stop pregnancies in poorer women and new trips to London for the ones who can pay for it. These actions are supported by the Spanish Bishops’ Conference[vi].

Besides, the neoliberal economic measures that the Government has recently adopted are diminishing public services such as education, health and social services for children and the elderly, which will not make it easier for women to have children if they so desire.

Philippines: RH Bill advocates ask that the bill be passed in the House of Representatives on August 7. The current President of the Philippines, President Benigno Aquino III, supports it, as well as 143 congressmen and women. The Reproductive Health Advocacy Network that gathers health service providers, women’s organizations, people’s organizations, party-list federations and academic institutions is organizing campaigns, rallies, demonstrations and press conferences to support the RH Bill[vii].   

Spain: In view of the seriousness of the situation due to the attack on the sexual and reproductive health in the country, 222 women’s organizations, health providers and political parties have created the platform “Nosotras decidimos”[viii] (We women decide). Hundreds of advocates rallied in Madrid on July 29, 2012 against the modification of the law[ix].

Philippines: Where 80% of the population is Catholic, 69% support the RH Bill[x].

Spain: More than 100,000 people have signed the petition against the modification of the current law[xi]. According to a Metroscopia survey, 65% of the Partido Popular voters and 64% of Catholics are against the suggested change, as well as 81% of the total population[xii].

Philippines: As Randy David says “What is more interesting to watch, in my view, is the extent to which our politicians will assert their independence from the clerics” (…) “The RH bill will be a test of how far the nation’s political system has achieved operational closure from religion. It will give us an indication of the state of our institutional modernity”[xiii].

Spain: The interpretation that has been made of Gallardón’s initiative is that he is trying to ingratiate himself with his voters, especially the more conservative Catholics and the right.

Can you see any similarities? Do you think it is a mere coincidence? Some days ago I read on a blog that “the fight for contraception has not only not finished – actually it hasn’t started yet”[xiv]. In some countries women and some brave men are asking for their sexual and reproductive rights, whereas in other countries we have to fight to preserve what was already attained. In different degrees, women’s rights are threatened everywhere in the world. Historically, women’s fight for rights has been a continuous struggle with progress and backlashes. And the reason is that there is a lot at stake. Sexual and reproductive health is clearly a political issue: it means women’s control of our own bodies, a challenge of the traditional order of privileges, a redefinition of life, a change in the hierarchical power relations and the empowerment of the entire population, women and men. The higher the opposition to our demands, the more important they are. The constant and peaceful revolution that women have been leading for centuries is the most empowering and liberating revolution for humanity ever. We have to be aware of the backlashes, but they will not make us give up. We will not give up.

RH Bill should be passed in the Philippines! The Sexual and Reproductive Health law should not be modified in Spain!
 
Derechos y salud sexual y reproductiva en Filipinas y España: pasado común, luchas comunes
 
Filipinas: La ley de salud reproductiva o RH Bill lleva siendo discutida durante los últimos 15 años, representando uno de los temas más controvertidos en el país actualmente. El próximo martes 7 de agosto será votada en el Congreso. El objetivo de esta ley es garantizar a las mujeres el acceso a la salud materna, la planificación familiar y la educación sexual, proporcionando a las mujeres (y a los hombres) la información correcta y adecuada que les permitirá decidir si y cuándo tener hijos e hijas. La toma de decisiones sólo es posible cuando el ser humano es consciente de las alternativas de las que dispone y puede tener acceso a ellas; de lo contrario la verdadera libertad no existe. La RH Bill será por lo tanto empoderadora para la población y mejorará la salud de las mujeres y la infancia, especialmente para las más pobres. El aborto es ilegal y seguirá siéndolo si la RH Bill se aprueba.

España: Durante la dictadura de Franco (1939-1975), la ideología nacional-católica prohibió los anticonceptivos bajo multa o arresto y el divorcio no estaba permitido. El aborto era ilegal, empujando a muchas mujeres a llevar a cabo abortos clandestinos a pesar de los riesgos para la salud, mientras que las mujeres de la clase alta podían costearse un viaje a Inglaterra con el mismo fin. En 1985, el aborto fue permitido bajo tres supuestos – el de violación de la mujer, malformaciones del feto o si existía riesgo para la salud física o mental de la mujer. Aun así, las mujeres necesitaban la autorización médica para ello. En 2009 el Partido Socialista aprobó una nueva ley, la Ley Orgánica 2/2010 de Salud Sexual y Reproductiva y de Interrupción Voluntaria del Embarazo, que garantiza educación sexual – aún escasa en el país-, permitía la compra de la “píldora del día después” en las farmacias sin receta médica y modifica la anterior legislación del aborto estableciendo un período de tiempo de 14 semanas para el aborto sin restricciones basado únicamente en la decisión de la mujer.

Filipinas: La Iglesia Católica en Filipinas, a pesar de sus afirmaciones de vida, libertad y dignidad humana, se opone a la aprobación de la RH Bill, afirmando que la anticoncepción y el aborto son lo mismo y presionando a congresistas para que voten en contra el 7 de agosto. La RH Bill trata únicamente de educación e información, es por lo tanto pro-elección, la Conferencia Episcopal Católica de Filipinas (Catholic Bishop Conference in the Philippines) prefiere mantener a la población ignorante y sin opciones[xv].

España: El Ministro de Justicia, Alberto Ruiz Gallardón (Partido Popular) ha afirmado que modificará la Ley de salud sexual y reproductiva el próximo mes de septiembre 2012, restringiendo los derechos garantizados actualmente. Defiende que la razón por la que las mujeres abortamos se debe a la existencia de una “violencia estructural” que nos fuerza a ello, no porque sea nuestra propia decisión – es decir, las mujeres no somos capaces de razonar sobre lo que necesitamos o queremos[xvi]. Incluso afirmó esta semana que prohibirá el aborto en los casos de fetos con anomalías incompatibles con la vida, lo que colocaría a España entre uno de los países más restrictivo de la UE[xvii].

Filipinas: Quince mujeres mueren al día por problemas relacionados con la salud materna, una de las tasas más elevadas de Asia, y nueve mil personas mueren al año por VIH/SIDA. Aunque el aborto es ilegal, en las calles se venden hierbas y remedios caseros (“pampa regla”) que lo inducen. El número aproximado de abortos clandestinos es de medio millón al año. La tasa de fertilidad en Filipinas es de 3’3 hijos/as por mujer; sin embargo esta tasa se duplica en el caso de las mujeres más pobres. Según datos del gobierno, un tercio de la población vive con un dólar al día. Los temas de salud reproductiva no son u problema para la clase alta que puede permitirse los anticonceptivos y el acceso a los servicios de salud, pero es una cuestión de supervivencia para las personas con menos recursos. A pesar de todo, La Iglesia Católica de Filipinas se opone a la aprobación de la RH Bill.

España: El gobierno ha restringido el acceso gratuito a los servicios de salud a las personas inmigrantes irregulares[xviii], dejando a 500.000 seres humanos sin el derecho a la salud en el país. Esto es especialmente grave en el caso de personas con VIH/SIDA que dejarán de recibir tratamiento médico. Por otro lado, la Ministra de Salud tiene su particular guerra contra la píldora del día después. Asegura que es peligrosa para la salud y considera que los resultados de los tres estudios que muestran lo contrario no son concluyentes[xix]. Al mismo tiempo, el Ministro de Justicia quiere restringir el derecho de las mujeres a abortos seguros, lo que conducirá a acciones clandestinas para detener los embarazos en el caso de las mujeres más pobres y nuevos viajes a Londres para las que se lo puedan permitir. Estas acciones son apoyadas por la Conferencia Episcopal española[xx].

Por otro lado, las medidas económicas de corte neoliberal que el gobierno está adoptando recientemente están disminuyendo servicios públicos como educación, sanidad y servicios de atención a la dependencia y la infancia, lo que no facilitará que las mujeres tengan hijas/os si desean hacerlo.

Filipinas: Defensoras y defensores de la RH Bill exigen que se apruebe en el Congreso el próximo 7 de agosto. El actual presidente de Filipinas, Benigno Aquino III, la apoya así como 143 congresistas. La Reproductive Health Advocacy Network que reúne servicios de salud, organizaciones de mujeres, organizaciones populares, partidos políticos e instituciones académicas está emprendiendo campañas, manifestaciones, demostraciones y ruedas de prensa en apoyo a la RH Bill[xxi].

España: Ante la seriedad de la situación por el ataque a la salud sexual y reproductiva en el país, 222 asociaciones de mujeres, servicios de salud y partidos políticos han creado la plataforma “Nosotras decidimos”[xxii]. Cientos de defensoras y defensores se manifestaron en Madrid el pasado 29 de julio contra la modificación de la ley[xxiii].

Filipinas: Donde el 80% de la población es católica, el 69% apoya la RH Bill[xxiv].

España: Más de 100.000 personas han firmado la petición en contra de la reforma de la actual ley[xxv]. Según una encuesta de Metroscopia, el 65% de los electores y electoras del Partido Popular y el 64% de las personas que se declaran católicas practicantes están en contra de la reforma sugerida, así como el 81% de la población total[xxvi].

Filipinas: Como Randy David afirma “Lo que es más interesante de ver, desde mi punto de vista, es el grado que nuestros políticos tienen de afirmar su independencia del clero” (…) “La RH Bill será la mejor prueba para comprobar hasta dónde nuestro sistema político nacional ha alcanzado su ruptura operacional con la religión. Nos ofrecerá un indicativo del estado de nuestra modernidad institucional”[xxvii].

España: La interpretación de las iniciativas de Gallardón es que intenta congratularse con su electorado, especialmente con el más conservador y católico.

¿Alguna similitud? ¿Mera coincidencia? Hace algunos días leí en un blog que “la lucha por la anticoncepción no sólo no ha terminado – no ha empezado todavía”[xxviii]. En algunos países las mujeres y algunos hombres valientes demandan sus derechos sexuales y reproductivos, mientras que en otros luchamos por preservar lo que se había conseguido hasta ahora. A diferentes niveles, los derechos de las mujeres se ven amenazados en todos los rincones del planeta. Históricamente la lucha de las mujeres por sus derechos ha sido una continua resistencia con pasos hacia adelante y hacia atrás. Y la razón de esto es que hay mucho en juego. La salud sexual y reproductiva es un claro asunto político: significa el control de las mujeres de nuestros propios cuerpos, un desafío al orden tradicional de privilegios, una redefinición de la vida, un cambio en las jerárquicas relaciones de poder y el empoderamiento del conjunto de la población, mujeres y hombres. Cuanta más oposición haya a nuestras demandas, más importantes significa que son. La revolución constante y pacífica que las mujeres protagonizan desde hace siglos es la más empoderadora y liberadora revolución para la humanidad. Hemos de ser conscientes de los retrocesos, pero no nos harán abandonar. No abandonaremos.

¡La RH Bill debe ser aprobada en Filipinas! ¡La Ley de salud sexual y reproductiva no debe modificarse en España!

 

facebook rndyoutube rnd twitter rnd